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8 Best Reasons to Not Give a Live Bunny for Easter

Becki has been an online writer for over five years. Her articles often focus on holidays and DIY holiday festivities.

Live animals don't make very good gifts for children, so consider these reasons, this Easter, for why you shouldn't give a child a live rabbit as a gift.

Live animals don't make very good gifts for children, so consider these reasons, this Easter, for why you shouldn't give a child a live rabbit as a gift.

With Easter coming up, those precious bunnies in the pet stores are about to start looking all the more appealing to consumers looking for an interesting gift for their children. No doubt some parents will fall victims to the craze of wanting to do something different for their child this year, and as a result, bunnies across the country will be miserable. Some will die and others will languish because of a poorly considered decision to purchase a rabbit as a gift for a child at Easter.

This page lists the reasons why you should not purchase a rabbit this Easter as a gift for a child. These reasons are specific to bunnies because many new owners lack knowledge about this species of animal and their care requirements, and pet stores aren't in a hurry to fill you in.

Why You Shouldn't Give a Bunny as an Easter Gift

  1. Rabbit don't do well with young children.
  2. Rabbits are social creatures and should be kept in pairs.
  3. Rabbits shouldn't just be left outdoors.
  4. Rabbits need space.
  5. Rabbits require specialized veterinary care.
  6. Rabbits require a lot of work.
  7. Rabbits live long lives.
  8. Rabbits should be neutered, like cats and dogs.
Rabbits are adorable and can make excellent pets, but their care may be complicated and owners need to do their research before purchasing an animal.

Rabbits are adorable and can make excellent pets, but their care may be complicated and owners need to do their research before purchasing an animal.

Bunnies Are Cute, and They Make Good Pets

Admittedly, bunnies are adorable and tempting, and they make amazing pets for people who have the right personality type to take care of a rabbit. Affectionate and generally sweet-natured, many breeds fit right into family life with adults and older children.

Which begs the question: Why not purchase a bunny as a gift for a child this Easter? If rabbits make such good pets, then why should they be avoided specifically at this time of year. Is there something wrong with Easter?

The only thing that's wrong about Easter is that this time of year, everybody wants a rabbit. People aren't thinking about the commitment of ownership or the meaning to the rabbit or the family when this animal is brought into the home. At other times of year, parents may be more cautious or considerate, may view this as a live animal in need of care, but at Easter, the rabbit is often regarded simply as a prop, a toy, something "Easter-y."

Rabbits make amazing pets and if you want to buy one, by all means, you should get a rabbit—at another time of the year when they aren't being mass produced in "farms" to be sold at Easter to undereducated pet owners.

Rabbits are adorable, but they are living animals who deserve the best care. Research is required to make a good pet owner.

Rabbits are adorable, but they are living animals who deserve the best care. Research is required to make a good pet owner.

Alternatives to Pet Rabbits for Easter

If you really want to give a rabbit for Easter, nobody's going to stop you. You should still probably read through this article to get a feel for the reasons why it's not a good idea to get a pet for a holiday, but in the meantime, please consider some alternatives to live rabbits as pets for your children this Easter.

  • Stuffed rabbits are an excellent option. You may even be able to purchase stuffed rabbits made of real fur, if you don't have a moral objection to fur being used on your stuffed animals. These can be found on Ebay and Etsy and while relatively expensive, they are often beautiful. Maybe you could even make your own!
  • Chocolate rabbits are seasonable and easy to find at Easter! Who doesn't love some Easter candy? Chocolate rabbits are a great gift for children, and in particular those who either don't get to have a lot of sweets or who have been abstaining for Lent. Better yet, they don't take up any space at all once eaten!
Remember that rabbits require care and are personalities just like other animals!

Remember that rabbits require care and are personalities just like other animals!

Rabbits don't do well with young children, who may not understand how fragile they are.

Rabbits don't do well with young children, who may not understand how fragile they are.

1. Rabbit Don't Do Well with Young Children

In general, Rabbits don't make good pets for young children. Younger children have a hard time learning how to handle smaller animals, and may be kicked in the process of learning to handle holding a rabbit. Furthermore, bunnies don't always want to be held, and young children can be particularly hands-on and "grabby."

While rabbits can make great pets for older children, teenagers and adults, children under the age of 9 or 10 may not be ready for the responsibilities of taking care of a rabbit and could accidentally hurt the animal. If you absolutely must consider getting a live rabbit for your child this Easter, please do so with older children instead of the younger ones!

Bunnies do best in pairs, and must be neutered in order to do so. Neutering can be complex with rabbits, and this further complicates pet ownership for those wishing to obtain a rabbit or rabbits for Easter.

Bunnies do best in pairs, and must be neutered in order to do so. Neutering can be complex with rabbits, and this further complicates pet ownership for those wishing to obtain a rabbit or rabbits for Easter.

2. Rabbits are Social Creatures and Should be Kept in Pairs

In the wild, rabbits have a complex social structure. They've carried this into their domesticated breeds as well, and bunnies will always do best if they're kept in pairs with one another. Impulsive purchases of "Easter bunnies" make this prohibitive, as young rabbits are difficult to sex and keeping two bucks (male rabbits) together is ill-advised, as the bunnies may fight one another, particularly if they aren't neutered. Social as they are, rabbits can also be territorial.

If you are seriously considering purchasing a rabbit, you may wish to look into your local House Rabbit Society so that you can obtain a bonded pair. They are often available through rescues and already altered. This makes your job much easier!

Myths about Rabbits You Should Know Before Buying an "Easter Bunny"

Rabbits shouldn't be made to live their lives outdoors.

Rabbits shouldn't be made to live their lives outdoors.

3. Rabbits Shouldn't Just Be Left Outdoors

While rabbits can be put in a hutch outdoors to live, this is not an advised practice. Rabbits are highly social creatures (as mentioned above) and require interaction with one another and with their humans. Putting your rabbit outdoors means that they are susceptible to parasites, predators, and that they (probably) get less interaction with you. Keeping your rabbit indoors is the best practice for their well-being and for your enjoyment.

Rabbits are happiest when kept in the house. They can be given the run of the house if they are litter box trained (which is a relatively easy process with rabbits) and the house is "rabbit-proofed."

Bunnies need lots of space to roam and don't make good apartment pets because they need to be able to exercise.

Bunnies need lots of space to roam and don't make good apartment pets because they need to be able to exercise.

Rabbits are happiest when they have room to move around in their environment.

Rabbits are happiest when they have room to move around in their environment.

4. Rabbits Need Space

Rabbits are not the kind of pet that can be put into a cage and forgotten about. Unlike small rodents, they need to have room to stretch their legs, and a wheel or other type of device won't be satisfactory for these animals. Because their back legs are strong and powerful, bunnies need room to stretch their muscles and to move around. It's best if they can spend some time outside (where they can nibble on vegetation as well) with the supervision of their caretakers, but if kept indoors they need space to hop around in.

Please don't expect to be able to purchase a rabbit with a "starter kit" and leave your rabbit in the hutch or cage all the time. Your rabbit will be miserable and you will have wasted a life.

Rabbits, like this pretty white bunny, require specialized veterinary care.

Rabbits, like this pretty white bunny, require specialized veterinary care.

5. Rabbits Require Specialized Veterinary Care

Unlike dogs and cats, rabbits require special veterinarians who have studied lapine medicine. Most exotic veterinarians can see rabbits, but you'll want to make sure that you have one available in your area.

Talk to your vet before purchasing a rabbit to make sure that your veterinarian of choice has experience with rabbits and that he or she is able to perform the desired services, such as neutering your pet(s) in order to prevent the marking of territory or the production of kits (baby rabbits).

6. Rabbits Require a Lot of Work

Young children in particular may not be able to handle the work load that comes with rabbit ownership. Litter boxes need to be changed, cages need to be cleaned and rabbits need to be fed, watered and exercised. They also need quite a bit of company when kept by themselves, and young owners aren't always conscious of the needs of the creatures surrounding them.

Rabbits are most appropriate for people who understand the rigors (and joys) of owning these amazing little creatures. They should be reserved for older children, teens and adults who are fully prepared to put the work into taking good care of a pet.

Live bunnies aren't toys. If you don't think that your child is prepared to take care of a live animal, perhaps a stuffed rabbit is more appropriate.

Rabbits live relatively long lives, similar to the life span of a large dog -- if they're properly cared for.

Rabbits live relatively long lives, similar to the life span of a large dog -- if they're properly cared for.

Rabbits may live into their teens. They aren't short-lived pets and require a serious commitment on the part of their owners. Like any pet, they are for life!

Rabbits may live into their teens. They aren't short-lived pets and require a serious commitment on the part of their owners. Like any pet, they are for life!

7. Rabbits Live Long Lives

If they are properly cared for and are not in some way put into the way of danger (i.e. kept outdoors where predators or extreme temperatures can harm them) rabbits can live to be between 10-12 years old. Rabbits have a life span similar to large dogs! When purchasing a rabbit, this is something to take into consideration. That cute little bunny you bought your daughter for Easter is going to grow up and live for long enough that she may have to leave the bunny at home when she goes to college. Are you prepared to care for an animal for this long?

Just like you see with dogs and cats, the message is this: A pet is for life.

Quiz

For each question, choose the best answer. The answer key is below.

  1. What is a male rabbit called?
    • A bull.
    • A dog.
    • A buck.
    • A bully.
  2. What is a baby rabbit called?
    • A kit.
    • A pup.
    • A bunny.
    • A kid.
  3. What's the best combination of two rabbits?
    • Altered males.
    • Altered females.
    • Altered male and female.
  4. Can rabbits see the same vets as cats and dogs?
    • Yes.
    • No.
    • Only if the vet has experience with rabbits.
  5. How often should rabbits be picked up?
    • As often as possible.
    • Twice a day.
    • As infrequently as possible.
    • Once a week.
  6. Can rabbits be litter box trained?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  7. Where is the best place to keep rabbits?
    • In an outdoor hutch.
    • In an indoor cage.
    • Loose in the house.
    • A combination of 2 & 3.

Answer Key

  1. A buck.
  2. A kit.
  3. Altered male and female.
  4. Only if the vet has experience with rabbits.
  5. As infrequently as possible.
  6. Yes.
  7. A combination of 2 & 3.

8. Rabbits Should be Neutered, Like Cats and Dogs

Your rabbit will need to be neutered. This process isn't inexpensive, and while low-cost neutering services exist in most areas for dogs and cats, you'll have to pay the full cost to neuter your rabbits.

Some vets do a discounted neutering if you're altering two rabbits, as bonding is important for this species. However, neutering may run as much as $500 per rabbit. Are you prepared to put this much of an investment into a treat you bought your child for Easter? If not, try getting your son or daughter a stuffed rabbit instead.

© 2014 Becki Rizzuti

Comments

Kristen Howe from Northeast Ohio on January 17, 2016:

Becca, this is an interesting hub about bunnies and Easter. This was real interesting and amusing to know why they don't make good pets for little kids. Great pics and congrats on HOTD!

Kate Swanson from Sydney on January 17, 2016:

I never knew that rabbits could be house-trained!

Patty Inglish MS from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on April 20, 2014:

The last time I visited the University of Victoria in BC, I found that the campus is squirrel-free, but its green spaces are filled with black, white, and patchwork rabbits. A group of bunnies escaped a science lab there once, and took over. You see them in many groups of over a dozen. They run if you try to pet them, but they will sit and eat lettuce while you watch, if you give them a few leaves.

CrisSp from Sky Is The Limit Adventure on April 20, 2014:

I want a rabbit for myself but I suffer from severe allergy, so to have one would kill me. *sadly*

Interesting and very useful hub. Up and sharing.

Becki Rizzuti (author) from Indianapolis, Indiana on February 24, 2014:

I've had rabbits that got sick and rabbits that never got sick. Different owners have different experiences but all in all I think that breed may have something to do with the frailty of the rabbit itself. Hardier breeds of course will be less susceptible to illnesses.

I don't personally know much about guinea pigs, but I love rats!

Suzanne Day from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on February 24, 2014:

As a guinea pig lover myself, I have often heard about how rabbits are harder to care for because they get special illnesses. The ones I saw always seemed to be extra shy and not happy around energetic or loud children. I agree it's probably best to stick to a stuffed bunny for Easter. Voted useful!

Becki Rizzuti (author) from Indianapolis, Indiana on February 23, 2014:

Neutered rabbits shouldn't have the same odor as unneutered rabbits of either gender. The males can be quite musky though if they aren't fixed and you've really got to keep on top of their litter boxes -- daily emptying is optimal.

Jeannie Marie from Baltimore, MD on February 23, 2014:

This is an excellent hub full of good information for people considering getting a rabbit for Easter. I had a friend that kept rabbits and they were A LOT of responsibility. She lived in an apartment, too, so the smell was not always so nice either. She ended up getting rid of them, which was sad but for the best. Thanks for publishing this hub! I hope it helps others not make a commitment they can't keep.

Becki Rizzuti (author) from Indianapolis, Indiana on February 23, 2014:

We have a society here in central Indiana for abandoned house rabbits. They like to adopt them out in pairs whenever they can and they bond bunnies together pre-adoption. It's an excellent program and I've considered adopting from them in the past, but with four (until recently, five) cats and two dogs in the house, it wouldn't work out for us right now.

Too many people don't think about what they're doing when they purchase pets as gifts.

Patty Inglish MS from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on February 23, 2014:

We have a Center for House Rabbit Adoption in Central Ohio, caring for abandoned gift bunnies until they are adopted. It is on a busy major street that becomes Route 23, so many people can see it as they drive by.