Celebrating Chinese New Year in Singapore

Updated on October 17, 2018
CYong74 profile image

Yong earned a bachelor's degree in communication studies in 1999. His interests include history, traveling, mythology, and video gaming.

Chinese New Year in Singapore is a fascinating display of red, gold, and enchanting street decorations.
Chinese New Year in Singapore is a fascinating display of red, gold, and enchanting street decorations.

Chinese New Year is the first of several major ethnic festivals to take place in Singapore each year. With 70 percent of the Singaporean population being Southern Chinese, the festival is considered one of the most important in the city-state. Preparation and anticipation for it can be felt anywhere throughout the island for about a month before the actual holiday.

The dates for Chinese New Year are typically around the first half of February, sometimes happening as early as late January. Because of this, there is always a palpable sensation of “gearing-to-go” the moment Christmas and January 1st are over. Bazaars spring up all over Singapore overnight. Some malls creatively refurbish their Christmas decorations to suit the lunar festival too. Christmas puddings and Santa Claus are also speedily replaced with New Year kuay (cakes) and jovial Gods of Fortune, with red and gold becoming the dominant colours everywhere. One knows Chinese New Year is near when at every corner, there is a red decoration glittering with golden Chinese characters.

Chinatown Light-Up and Festive Bazaar

Each year, the showpiece of the Chinatown Light-Up is the gigantic Chinese Zodiac animal of the incoming year.
Each year, the showpiece of the Chinatown Light-Up is the gigantic Chinese Zodiac animal of the incoming year.

The harbinger of Chinese New Year in Singapore is the annual Chinatown festive light-up and street bazaar. A grand ceremony kick-starts this in January each year, transforming the heritage district into a bustling festive playground with stalls retailing New Year goods everywhere. The bazaar itself lasts till Chinese New Year’s Eve, and from start to end, is always packed with festive shoppers and tourists every night.

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The festive bazaar is open throughout the day, with peak hours being evening time.The main street of the festive bazaar.As evening descends over the bazaar.Happy festive shoppers.The festive bazaar at Chinatown can get quite crowded. This picture was taken on a Monday.
The festive bazaar is open throughout the day, with peak hours being evening time.
The festive bazaar is open throughout the day, with peak hours being evening time. | Source
The main street of the festive bazaar.
The main street of the festive bazaar.
As evening descends over the bazaar.
As evening descends over the bazaar.
Happy festive shoppers.
Happy festive shoppers.
The festive bazaar at Chinatown can get quite crowded. This picture was taken on a Monday.
The festive bazaar at Chinatown can get quite crowded. This picture was taken on a Monday.

Nowadays, Chinese New Year goods are easily found all over Singapore. Despite that, many Singaporeans, Chinese and non-Chinese, still visit the Chinatown bazaar, if only to soak in the festive ambience. On selected days, there are also street performances in and around the bazaar. Ask any Singaporean where to go within the country at the start of the year, and Chinatown would surely be the first suggestion. With so much to see and sample, it is certainly an event not to be missed.

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Many shopping malls host festive bazaars during Chinese New Year in Singapore too. These tend to feature renowned caterers and hotel confectioneries. All sorts of exotic candies and snacks on sale.Festive bazaars such as this pop up all over residential areas too.Cheerful Chinese gods of fortune. With the "fu" character (blessings) everywhere.
Many shopping malls host festive bazaars during Chinese New Year in Singapore too. These tend to feature renowned caterers and hotel confectioneries.
Many shopping malls host festive bazaars during Chinese New Year in Singapore too. These tend to feature renowned caterers and hotel confectioneries.
All sorts of exotic candies and snacks on sale.
All sorts of exotic candies and snacks on sale.
Festive bazaars such as this pop up all over residential areas too.
Festive bazaars such as this pop up all over residential areas too.
Cheerful Chinese gods of fortune. With the "fu" character (blessings) everywhere.
Cheerful Chinese gods of fortune. With the "fu" character (blessings) everywhere.

Waterloo Street

Besides Chinatown, Waterloo Street is also a centre of celebration during Chinese New Year in Singapore. While the festive market here is much smaller, it is equally popular because the area is next to the beloved Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple (see below) and Bugis Street Market. There is also a popular shrine to Phra Phrom, or Thailand's revered Four-Face Buddha. Many shoppers thus take the opportunity to offer respects to Kwam Im and Phra Phrom while shopping for New Year festive goodies here.

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A huge Cai Shen, or Chinese God of Money, welcoming shoppers to the Waterloo Street festive market. The festive market itself.Many Chinese New Year decorations have "8" in their prices because the Hokkien pronunciation for 8 rhymes with Huat, which means windfall.Predictions for the 2017 Year of the Rooster using the Chinese Zodiac system. Such predictions are very popular in Singapore and can be found in many other places in the country too.
A huge Cai Shen, or Chinese God of Money, welcoming shoppers to the Waterloo Street festive market.
A huge Cai Shen, or Chinese God of Money, welcoming shoppers to the Waterloo Street festive market.
The festive market itself.
The festive market itself.
Many Chinese New Year decorations have "8" in their prices because the Hokkien pronunciation for 8 rhymes with Huat, which means windfall.
Many Chinese New Year decorations have "8" in their prices because the Hokkien pronunciation for 8 rhymes with Huat, which means windfall.
Predictions for the 2017 Year of the Rooster using the Chinese Zodiac system. Such predictions are very popular in Singapore and can be found in many other places in the country too.
Predictions for the 2017 Year of the Rooster using the Chinese Zodiac system. Such predictions are very popular in Singapore and can be found in many other places in the country too.

Red, Gold, and Glorious Food

According to some locals, Chinese New Year in Singapore is all about food. Others say it’s all about prosperity and money-making, or stunning career success in the coming year.

The reason for these claims is evident the moment one steps into any Chinese New Year bazaar in Singapore, be it the Chinatown one or elsewhere. Food stalls are everywhere. Long queues also form before stalls selling traditional Chinese New Year foods such as bwa kwa. Next to these are, of course, the decoration stores. Always red and with eye-catching gold, these stores are full of decorations prominently featuring the Chinese Zodiac animal of the incoming year. Those able to read Chinese will immediately notice wordings on the decorations all being well wishes for prosperity and easy money making. Of note, Huat, the Hokkien-Chinese word for windfall, is the most commonly used character. Even cakes and snacks are often adorned with Huat during Chinese New Year in Singapore.

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A sea of red all over.Gold, the colour of wealth, is very popular too.Nian Gao, or sticky Chinese New Year rice cake, is a must-eat during the festival. It symbolises many auspicious happenings.The traditional snacks of peanuts and Chinese-style melon seeds are very popular too.Bwa Kwa is the ever popular Southeast Asian Chinese snack of BBQ marinated pork jerky. Long queues often form outside popular stores during the festive season.
A sea of red all over.
A sea of red all over.
Gold, the colour of wealth, is very popular too.
Gold, the colour of wealth, is very popular too. | Source
Nian Gao, or sticky Chinese New Year rice cake, is a must-eat during the festival. It symbolises many auspicious happenings.
Nian Gao, or sticky Chinese New Year rice cake, is a must-eat during the festival. It symbolises many auspicious happenings.
The traditional snacks of peanuts and Chinese-style melon seeds are very popular too.
The traditional snacks of peanuts and Chinese-style melon seeds are very popular too.
Bwa Kwa is the ever popular Southeast Asian Chinese snack of BBQ marinated pork jerky. Long queues often form outside popular stores during the festive season.
Bwa Kwa is the ever popular Southeast Asian Chinese snack of BBQ marinated pork jerky. Long queues often form outside popular stores during the festive season.

Chinese New Year’s Eve and Reunion Dinner

One of the most important rituals of Chinese New Year in Singapore is the Reunion Dinner, which takes place on the evening of the Eve. On this night, Chinese families gather for a sumptuous dinner. The dinner itself symbolises unity and harmony of the entire extended family.

In the past, mothers and grandmothers would slog for days to prepare for this important dinner. Food markets would also be packed with frantic shoppers right up to the last moment. Nowadays, though, many Singaporean families opt to have their Reunion Dinners at restaurants instead. This in turn translates to practically all Chinese restaurants operating on the Eve offering only Reunion Dinner packages, with these packages usually fully booked way in advance. For tourists, this is something to take note of, it can be a tough challenge finding a place to eat on the Eve. Even Non-Chinese eateries, such as fast-food outlets, could be very crowded with long queues on that important night.

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Hotpot, or steamboat, is a popular Northern China dish because of the cold weather there. While Singapore's climate is far from chilly, many families still have steamboat for their Reunion Dinners.Poon Choi, or Pen Cai, is another popular Reunion Dinner dish. It means "big bowl feast," and contains different delicacies cooked in a thick stew.
Hotpot, or steamboat, is a popular Northern China dish because of the cold weather there. While Singapore's climate is far from chilly, many families still have steamboat for their Reunion Dinners.
Hotpot, or steamboat, is a popular Northern China dish because of the cold weather there. While Singapore's climate is far from chilly, many families still have steamboat for their Reunion Dinners.
Poon Choi, or Pen Cai, is another popular Reunion Dinner dish. It means "big bowl feast," and contains different delicacies cooked in a thick stew.
Poon Choi, or Pen Cai, is another popular Reunion Dinner dish. It means "big bowl feast," and contains different delicacies cooked in a thick stew.

Other rituals for the Chinese New Year's Eve, albeit less formal ones, include visiting flower bazaars and offering prayers at temples after Reunion Dinner. The former, called guang hua shi (逛花市) in Chinese, originated from the olden custom of visiting bazaars to buy festive plants as decorations. Naturally, most Chinese families nowadays would have already purchased all their decorations by the Eve, but guang hua shi remains a popular outing with many, especially with stalls often offering outrageous bargains before closing at midnight. For the religious, the hours before midnight are for visits to popular temples and shrines, purpose being to offer prayers to deities at the onset of the New Year. Such prayers, or di yi zhu xiang (第一柱香), invite peace and blessings for the whole of the New Year. In Singapore, the Waterloo Street Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple is the foremost location for this practice. The area and the surrounding bazaars are always packed from late evening till past midnight.

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The Cockscomb is a classic Chinese New Year bloom. It is perennially popular during Chinese New Year in Singapore.Other than traditional Chinese New Year plants such as Cockscombs and "Phoenix Tails," all sorts of other plants are also sold at the festive bazaars.Artificial plants are very popular too. Especially exotic oriental blooms like peonies.Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple is the most popular temple for offerings on Chinese New Year's Eve.The Waterloo Street queues at midnight.
The Cockscomb is a classic Chinese New Year bloom. It is perennially popular during Chinese New Year in Singapore.
The Cockscomb is a classic Chinese New Year bloom. It is perennially popular during Chinese New Year in Singapore.
Other than traditional Chinese New Year plants such as Cockscombs and "Phoenix Tails," all sorts of other plants are also sold at the festive bazaars.
Other than traditional Chinese New Year plants such as Cockscombs and "Phoenix Tails," all sorts of other plants are also sold at the festive bazaars.
Artificial plants are very popular too. Especially exotic oriental blooms like peonies.
Artificial plants are very popular too. Especially exotic oriental blooms like peonies.
Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple is the most popular temple for offerings on Chinese New Year's Eve.
Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple is the most popular temple for offerings on Chinese New Year's Eve.
The Waterloo Street queues at midnight.
The Waterloo Street queues at midnight. | Source

Da Nian Chu Yi, the First Day of Chinese New Year

With most shops and businesses closed, the streets of Singapore are relatively quiet on the first day of Chinese New Year. There is, however, plenty of human traffic, with Chinese families rushing to visit relatives while decked out in bright colours. Look closer and you would see most families also carrying vivid paper carriers containing Mandarin oranges. These oranges are the standard and the must for any Chinese New Year house visit, as they symbolize gold.

Chinese children love the new year, for they receive hong bao, or red packets. These are small envelopes containing money. Nowadays, hong bao come in all shades of red.
Chinese children love the new year, for they receive hong bao, or red packets. These are small envelopes containing money. Nowadays, hong bao come in all shades of red.

The closure of the Chinatown bazaar on the Eve also doesn’t mean the cessation of street celebrations. In fact, a bigger, more dazzling one begins toward the end of the Chinatown celebrations. Known as River Hongbao and nowadays situated at The Float @ Marina Bay, this is a large open-air exhibition featuring immense lanterns, cultural performances, and even fireworks. For Singaporeans, River Hongbao replaces Chinatown as the place to go after the arrival of the New Year. With the spectacular Singapore skyline as backdrop, there is indeed nowhere else in the country more suitable for such a celebration. Nowhere else more atmospheric to embrace the New Year too.

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Huge festive lanterns are the main attractions of River Hongbao. This is the ever popular God of Money.Rooster theme display to welcome the Year of the Rooster 2017Overview of the fairground. With the famous Marina Bay Sands Integrated Resort in the background.Kids performing on stage.An "explosive" stage performance to celebrate Chinese New Year in Singapore.
Huge festive lanterns are the main attractions of River Hongbao. This is the ever popular God of Money.
Huge festive lanterns are the main attractions of River Hongbao. This is the ever popular God of Money.
Rooster theme display to welcome the Year of the Rooster 2017
Rooster theme display to welcome the Year of the Rooster 2017
Overview of the fairground. With the famous Marina Bay Sands Integrated Resort in the background.
Overview of the fairground. With the famous Marina Bay Sands Integrated Resort in the background.
Kids performing on stage.
Kids performing on stage.
An "explosive" stage performance to celebrate Chinese New Year in Singapore.
An "explosive" stage performance to celebrate Chinese New Year in Singapore. | Source

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 Kuan Leong Yong

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      • CYong74 profile imageAUTHOR

        Kuan Leong Yong 

        20 months ago from Singapore

        Hey Paul, thanks for commenting! I'm happy to know the article brought back memories for you. Incidentally, I didn't have nian gao this new year, again. Somehow, glutinous rice stopped agreeing with my stomach, or vice versa, and I can't eat it without getting a massive gastric disorder.

        I miss it a lot!

      • Paul Kuehn profile image

        Paul Richard Kuehn 

        20 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand

        I really enjoyed reading this article and viewing your great colorful pictures. This all brings back memories of the Chinese New Year festivals which I celebrated in Taiwan in the 70s. I especially remember eating the delicious glutinous rice cake, niang gao or kuay. We called it "di gui" in Taiwanese and it was either sweet or salty. I liked the sweet variety.

      • CYong74 profile imageAUTHOR

        Kuan Leong Yong 

        21 months ago from Singapore

        Hey AliciaC, thanks for your comment. I do hope you can visit us, or the region, some day eventually.

      • AliciaC profile image

        Linda Crampton 

        21 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

        The New Year celebration sounds like such fun. I love your descriptions and the colourful photos. I appreciate this article because it's highly unlikely that I'll ever be able to visit Singapore myself. I enjoy learning about it by reading articles like this.

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