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How to Craft Beautiful Easter Egg Ornaments You Can Keep Forever

Updated on May 05, 2016

Eggs That Last after Easter is Gone

Each year, after painstakingly decorating all those gorgeous eggs it's sad to see them smashed and scattered, nothing but some shell remnants ground into the carpeting to remind you of their former grandeur. But you can keep these unique and eclectic egg ornaments around long after Easter is gone.

Some of These Non-Traditional Easter Eggs Can be Displayed at Any Time of the Year, and Would Make Great Christmas Ornaments

Easter Egg Ornaments made from blown eggs
Easter Egg Ornaments made from blown eggs

How to Empty out the Eggs

You'll need to poke a small hole in each end of the egg. Try to center the hole for best looking results. I used a screw for this, you could use a needle or a drill, but the screw worked well. Twist it back and forth till you get the hole going, be gentle. Once you have pierced the shell, break up the yolk to make it easier to blow out.

Blow in one end of the egg until all the insides are on the outside. Once the eggs are all empty, I run some tap water through them, and then soak them for a while in a bleach solution.

After the eggs are dry I squirt a little white glue inside one of the holes and roll the egg around to coat the inside, that will strengthen your eggshell a little. After I am through decorating I coat the eggs with polyurethane or spray varnish to shine them up and add even more strength.

Once the eggs are empty and clean you can decorate many different ways. The only limit is your own imagination. Here I have shown how I made my silk dyed eggs, decoupage eggs and hand painted eggs.

Decoupage Eggs
Decoupage Eggs

Decoupage Eggs

This is my first try doing decoupage eggs. One big advantage to them is that they are much less fragile than the others; they won't shatter if you drop them. All you need is some colorful pictures and white glue. I used pictures from magazines for my decoupage eggs. You can do traditional type Easter designs like flowers and bunnies, but I chose to go more unconventional with these eggs.

I thinned the glue, about half water half glue, if you thin it too much it takes it longer to get tacky and stick, but it will eventually. Tear or cut the paper into small pieces and dip one piece at a time into the glue solution until it's saturated. Then just stick the pieces of paper on the eggs, overlapping them and smoothing them down with your fingers as you go. Try to get the air bubbles out and the edges to lay flat as much as possible, but avoid too much rubbing, as that will wear out the paper. Once your egg is covered let it dry, then re-coat with more thinned glue. As you add more coats of glue, the paper edges will begin to disappear.

Silk Dyed Eggs
Silk Dyed Eggs

Silk Dyed Eggs

You can get some interesting effects using silk to color eggs. For this technique, you must use real silk (at least that is what I've been told; actually, I have not tried any other fabric). I got some silk ties at a thrift shop, usually you can get them for 50 cents or a dollar, one will make several eggs.

Cut a piece of silk that will cover the egg, wrap the silk around the egg, right side touching the shell, then wrap the whole bundle snugly in white cloth and secure at the top with a twist tie or rubber band. You're trying to ensure that the silk is making good contact with the egg for the best transfer, but be careful, hollow eggs are more fragile than intact eggs and if you squeeze too tightly you may crush them.

Place your little bundles in a pot of water with a little vinegar added to it. They will float, so I used a cooling rack with a colander on top of it to hold them under water. Before I thought of this I did some without anything to hold them down, and it actually worked OK, I just rolled them around every time I thought about it.

Boil them for 20-30 minutes, and then allow them to cool before unwrapping.

How to dye eggs with silk step-by-step

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Silk ties are easy to find in thrift shopsMake sure the right side of the fabric is touching the egg.Wrap tightly with white cloth so insure contactThe eggs will float if you don't hold them down. I used a wire cooling rack.The colander provided extra weight to keep the eggs under water Here are my tie dyed eggs fresh out of the potEach egg sits on the tie it was dyed with
Silk ties are easy to find in thrift shops
Silk ties are easy to find in thrift shops
Make sure the right side of the fabric is touching the egg.
Make sure the right side of the fabric is touching the egg.
Wrap tightly with white cloth so insure contact
Wrap tightly with white cloth so insure contact
The eggs will float if you don't hold them down. I used a wire cooling rack.
The eggs will float if you don't hold them down. I used a wire cooling rack.
The colander provided extra weight to keep the eggs under water
The colander provided extra weight to keep the eggs under water
Here are my tie dyed eggs fresh out of the pot
Here are my tie dyed eggs fresh out of the pot
Each egg sits on the tie it was dyed with
Each egg sits on the tie it was dyed with
Hand Painted Eggs
Hand Painted Eggs

Hand Painted Eggs

I used oil paints on these eggs, just because I happened to have some around. You can use any kind of paint. Drawing on them with markers is a good option too. After I was through decorating the eggs, I gave all of them a coat of polyurethane to shine them up and make them a little less fragile.

Bamboo Skewers and Paper Beads

I put all of the eggs on bamboo skewers with beads in between to hold them apart whenever I needed to coat them with glue or poly or let them dry between coats.

All of the beads I used in this project are paper beads I made myself. I had never heard of them before I saw a great hub about them, so if you love them as much as I do be sure to follow the link to see how easy they are to make, and they are beautiful and practically free.

Bamboo Skewers are Perfect for Drying Eggs Between Coats

Some Tips for Making the Hangers

After your eggs are all finished and dry, you are ready to put the hangers on them.

You can achieve different effects by varying the type and texture of strings you use. I used ribbon, twine and waxed cord.

If you use stiff ribbon or waxed cord, you can poke it right through the egg from one hole to the other. For softer ribbon, I looped it though the waxed cord and used the cord to pull it through.

If you have trouble getting your hanger through the egg, you could tape it to the bamboo skewer and pull it through with that.

A bead on each side of the egg will look pretty and help cover the holes.

Display Your Treasures

These ornaments look nice in a window hanging from hooks in groups. You could make an Easter tree or a mobile to hang your eggs on. I'm sure you can think of lots of ways to display them.

I had fun making these beautiful Easter egg ornaments that I can keep forever. I hope you have fun with them too.

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    • Janet Pecoraro 4 years ago

      This sounds fun, Sherry! When we were kids, my mom would dye eggs with onion skins, too. I want to tell my daughters and daughters-in-law about your techniques.

      Happy Easter to you and your family!

      Janet =)

    • ishwaryaa22 profile image

      Ishwaryaa Dhandapani 4 years ago from Chennai, India

      Wow! This is an extremely creative and economical idea in creating Easter eggs and preserving them! Your egg-creations are amazing! The step-by-step procedure in creating silk-dyed eggs are detailed and well-explained with clear pictures. Look like you had a happy and fun-filled Easter!

      Thanks for SHARING. Useful, Awesome & Beautiful. Voted up and Socially Shared.

    • bizwin profile image

      Christabel Evans 4 years ago from England, UK

      These are great easter eggs decoration. I wish i've seen this some weeks back when my girl's school was doing an easter egg competition. Voted up.

    • Sherry Hewins profile image
      Author

      Sherry Hewins 4 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

      Thank you bizwin. I've been working on this for a while. Taking the pictures was actually the most challenging part. That looming Easter deadline finally made me get it together.

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      silk-dyed eggs is so neat. I have never seen that before and easy to do. Something I could do. Loved it. Voted up and Shared.

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