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Halloween Trick or Treat Alternatives for Teens and Tweens

Abby Slutsky's children enjoyed many of these alternatives to trick-or-treating.

Trick or treat alternatives can help teens and tweens have a wonderful Halloween. Photo by Mel Poole on Unsplash

Trick or treat alternatives can help teens and tweens have a wonderful Halloween. Photo by Mel Poole on Unsplash

Halloween Alternatives

Although trick-or-treating is an enjoyable activity for most children, at some point teens and tweens reach the age where they feel too old to trick or treat. Perhaps, each year fewer and fewer of their friends trick or treat, or sometimes they may have an older sibling that stops trick-or-treating.

More often than not, the decision to stop trick-or-treating is voluntary. However, it may surprise you to know that a few cities have ordinances that prevent older children from trick or treating once they get to a certain age. For example, an ordinance in Chesepeake, Virginia bans children who are 14 and older from trick or treating.

Whatever the reason, when tweens and teenagers outgrow trick-or-treating, they still may love Halloween and want to do something to celebrate. Fortunately, there are some wonderful alternatives to trick-or-treating that allow tweens and teens to enjoy Halloween.

With some advance planning, you can find a way to make money on Halloween while you still enjoy the spirit of the holiday. Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

With some advance planning, you can find a way to make money on Halloween while you still enjoy the spirit of the holiday. Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Employment Trick or Treat Alternatives

Imagine getting paid while enjoying an alternative to trick-or-treating for candy. These ideas can help teens and tweens put a few dollars in their pocket while enjoying the Halloween holiday.

1. Work at a Haunted House or Corn Maze

Some neighborhoods have haunted houses, corn mazes, or other Halloween activities open late on Halloween. Working at one of these activities can make teens feel like they have an alternative to trick-or-treating, and they will likely be around other young people that want to enjoy the holiday. Some of these work opportunities may even require teens to dress up.

Contact local farms, orchards, schools, and museums to see if they create these popular Halloween activities. Express interest in working there. Remember to arrange your work opportunity well in advance of the holiday.

2. Chaperone Younger Children

If you babysit, the family that you babysit for may be thrilled to hire you to take their children trick-or-treating. Many parents prefer to give out candy and may not want to walk the neighborhood, especially if it is cold. If you take children when it is dark, use a phone or flashlight to help keep a close eye on them.

Give out Halloween candy, and watch the younger children's excitement. Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Give out Halloween candy, and watch the younger children's excitement. Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Trick or Treat Alternatives That Help Your Family

1. Give Out Candy

Giving out Halloween candy is an excellent option for teens that are too old to trick or treat. Additionally, they can enjoy watching the younger children trick or treat and see their costumes. In fact, if they want, they can choose to wear a costume while they give out candy.

2. Plan a Halloween Scavenger Hunt for a Younger Sibling

Hide candy for a younger brother or sister, and let them experience the joy of searching for treats and finding them. If you do not want to make your own clues, try using printable clues.

Collecting money for a charity is an excellent trick or treat alternative that can benefit an organization and improve your college application. Photo by Mikhail Nilov from Pexels

Collecting money for a charity is an excellent trick or treat alternative that can benefit an organization and improve your college application. Photo by Mikhail Nilov from Pexels

Community Service Trick-or-Treating Alternatives

1. Collect Donations

A year or two before students apply to college; they frequently look for community service opportunities to help pad their college resumes. It can become challenging to do well in classes, keep up with after-school activities, and partake in community service. Performing a community service that takes a single evening is helpful.

Halloween is an ideal time to collect money for a charity. Teens and tweens should contact the charity in advance. Some charities will supply them with literature, a t-shirt, or a reusable bag with the charity’s logo or name. Getting information from the charity will help make parents confident that teens legitimately collect for the cause when they approach them for donations.

Ask for a contact who can give a reference when you present money to the charity. Some colleges may ask for community service references, and you will have a name handy to get a reference.

2. Volunteer on Halloween

Consider contacting a senior care center or another facility to see if they have volunteer opportunities to help make Halloween festive for residents.

Ask friends to bring a pumpkin, and they can have fun carving it. Photo by Kristina Paukshtite from Pexels

Ask friends to bring a pumpkin, and they can have fun carving it. Photo by Kristina Paukshtite from Pexels

Trick or Treat Alternatives with Friends

Teens may still enjoy spending Halloween with new friends or those they went trick-or-treating with when they were younger. These ideas are ideal for a group of teens that want an alternative to trick-or-treating.

1. Host or Attend a Halloween Party

If you are lucky enough to get an invite for a Halloween party, there is little to do other than choose a costume and arrive for the festivities.

However, some teens may prefer to host a Halloween party which allows them to control who joins them on Halloween. Planning a Halloween party can really help you get into the spirit of the holiday. Choosing, making, and putting up decorations sets the scene for the party, and the food can have a Halloween or scary theme. Creativity can go a long way in making a Halloween menu interesting.

2. See a Scary Movie

Planning a movie night with friends can be a terrific way to enjoy Halloween. Not only can teens enjoy a scary flick, but it is the perfect activity for indulging in some Halloween candy, even if you buy it at the store instead of collect it. Many teens have oversized television screens in their homes, so going to a theater may not be necessary.

3. Host a Pumpkin Carving Contest

Carving pumpkins can be an enjoyable way to get into the spirit of Halloween. To host a Halloween pumpkin carving contest, purchase pumpkin carving sets and have some knives on hand.

If you decide to supply the pumpkins, they frequently go on sale a day or two before Halloween. In my experience, markets frequently sell them cheaper than orchards. In the alternative, ask each invitee to bring a medium-sized pumpkin to your event.

Supply some stencils and pencils to help your friends make interesting designs. The Mocoosy stencils are wipeable plastic stencils that are reusable. The patterns range from simple to challenging, so everyone will find a stencil that suits their skills. Cover a large table with a plastic cloth, and set out the carving accessories before your friends arrive.

If desired, display the decorated pumpkins, and let trick or treaters vote on their favorites.

Whether a teen or tween wants to spend Halloween evening making money, enjoying Halloween with friends, helping out their family, or engaging in community service, there is an abundance of alternatives to trick-or-treating. Decide what appeals to you so that you can plan a memorable and enjoyable Halloween.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Abby Slutsky

Comments

Abby Slutsky (author) from America on August 16, 2021:

It sounds like you live in a terrific community. Thanks for reading and sharing your thoughts.

BRENDA ARLEDGE from Washington Court House on August 16, 2021:

Those are some great ideas...like getting a job at a haunted maze.

We have lots of those along with haunted houses & corn rides.

Our little community has an age limit also, but most of the children no longer go door to door.

The churches set up vehicles where they have park and treat ~ handing out candy.

The community holds two seperate celebrations. One at the park and one at the fairgrounds.

There is usually something for the older kids to enjoy.

Abby Slutsky (author) from America on August 16, 2021:

Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts.

Abby Slutsky (author) from America on August 16, 2021:

Thanks so much for reading.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on August 16, 2021:

You have written many plausible alternatives for teens on Halloween, Abby. We get fewer christen every year, but older teens do need an alternative.

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