How Some People Are Like Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

Updated on January 6, 2018
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Rev. Margaret Minnicks writes for three different websites: HubPages, Blasting News, and Vocal. She loves sharing interesting things.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Is Among Us

Around Christmas time, the song about Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer is heard on the radio, television and in department stores.

Even though the song is heard during that short period of time, there are many Rudolphs among us all through the year. Perhaps you are one of them.

Origin of 'Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer'

People have listened to the song since it was recorded in 1949, but many do not know the interesting origin of it.

The story was written in 1939 as a children's book by Robert L. May who was 35 years old at the time. It was during the Depression and Montgomery Ward department store in Chicago was not doing well financially. The store owner asked May to write a book for an annual Christmas promotion to save the store. He felt that a children's book would get parents to shop at the store.

May's boss rejected the story, but May was felt so strongly about it that he did not write a replacement. His boss had no other choice but to use it as a promotional. However, he did not want his name associated with it. Therefore, he gave May the rights to the story. After 2 million copies were shipped to Montgomery Wards stores around the country, it became a hit with children and their parents.

Things fell into place after May asked his songwriter brother-in-law to write a song about his story that chronicles the experiences of Rudolph, a youthful reindeer who proved his worth and led Santa's sleigh on a foggy Christmas Eve by using his red nose to do what the other eight reindeer couldn't do.

The song was picked up by Gene Autry, the singing cowboy in 1949, ten years after it was written. More than 25 million copies of the song were sold.

After that, the story became a classic holiday film, "Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer." Robert May and his family were taken care of financially throughout the end of their lives.

Many people think the story about Rudolph was based on May's own life because for a long time he was an underdog and outcast.

History of Rudolph
Story by Robert L. May
Song by Gene Autry
Classic Movie

How Rudolph Was Described

There is a much deeper meaning to the story about the reindeer that started out being just a silly little story that was made into a song.

The story of Rudolph is the perfect example of hope for anyone like Rudolph who can be described by four different terms.

  1. Oddball
  2. Underdog
  3. Misfit
  4. Outcast

Rudolph, the Oddball

Rudolph was considered an oddball. An oddball is someone who is different from the majority. The person is strange, bizarre, and odd.

Rudolph was indeed very different from the other eight reindeer, and they reminded him that he was an oddball.

Rudolph, the Underdog

Rudolph was an underdog. An underdog is someone who is made to feel inferior to others. Rudolph couldn't do what the others did even though he could do what they couldn't do.

The other eight reindeer teased Rudolph and called him names. They wouldn't let him play reindeer games with them.

Rudolph, the Misfit

Rudolph was a misfit because he didn't look like the other reindeer. He had a very shiny nose that glowed.

Have you ever felt like a misfit because you didn't look like or think like others in your group? Most people have felt like they didn't belong in a group until they could do something that no one else could do. A foggy night is coming when you will be able to use your "misfitness.""

Rudolph, the Outcast

Rudolph was ostracized and made to feel like he didn't belong. He was made fun of him and called names. He was left out and was described as an outcast until one Christmas Eve, he became a leader and was able to guide Santa's sleigh through the fog.

Then the other reindeer wanted to be his friend. The outcast proved that he could use his abnormal red nose to do what the others couldn't do.

The story of Rudolph is the perfect example of hope for anyone who is an oddball and outcast.

Advice For All the Rudolphs

Like Rudolph, there is hope for oddballs, underdogs, misfits, and outcasts all over the world.

Like Rudolph, the oddball, there will come a time when you will save the day with the qualities you have. Like Rudolph's red nose on a foggy night, you have something that will come in handy for someone, and you, too, will go down in history.

Like Rudolph, the underdog, you will be in the right place at the right time when someone will need your exceptional skills to do what others can't do. You will be the only one who will be able to accomplish the task. You will no longer be the underdog. Your status will go from inferior to superior.

Like Rudolph, the misfit, you will be able to save the day even though you don't look like, act like, or think like others in your group. A foggy night is coming when you will be able to use your "misfitness" to save the day or night.

Like Rudolph, the outcast, you have something that will allow you to do what no one else can do. There will come a time when you will be at the right place at the right time to help someone.

The song says Rudolph goes down in history as the most famous reindeer of them all. He has become legendary because people know his name and sing about him. There are only a few people who can name the other eight reindeer. If they can name them, they don't know about their characteristics and what they can do. However, Rudolph goes down in history for who he was and what he could do. There is hope for you to do the same.


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