How to Trick-or-Treat Safely by Social Distancing: 5 Tips - Holidappy - Celebrations
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How to Trick-or-Treat Safely by Social Distancing: 5 Tips

As a parent and teacher, Abby Slutsky is always concerned about the safety of children. Simple precautions can maximize safety.

Enjoy Halloween by trick-or-treating safely. Hold your bag or container away from you while collecting candy.

Enjoy Halloween by trick-or-treating safely. Hold your bag or container away from you while collecting candy.

You may be debating whether or not to take your young children trick-or-treating or whether to let your teens and tweens to go themselves. (Silently, you may be praying for rain.) However, assuming the weather cooperates, you are likely to relent and let your children enjoy Halloween. Nevertheless, if you do let them trick-or-treat, it is essential that they do their best to take safety precautions.

In the past, you may have been worried about strangers, your children eating candy before they arrived home to inspect it, or a child getting lost in the dark. Unfortunately, this year, you may also be concerned about germs and trick-or-treating safely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

5 Tips for Trick-or-Treating During the COVID-19 Pandemic

  1. Choose a Costume With a Mask to Maximize Safety
  2. Keep a Safe When Approaching a House
  3. Accompany Young Children to Each Door
  4. Limit Your Trick-or-Treating Group and Stay With Them
  5. Bring Sanitary Wipes

1. Choose a Costume With a Mask to Maximize Safety

During past Halloweens, teens and tweens may have skipped the costumes altogether or simply thrown on a little face makeup and a football shirt. This year, however, it is a good idea to take advantage of Halloween costumes that include masks (or create your own that incorporates a face shield or mask).

Many costumes also include gloves as an accessory, and the nature of the holiday is ideal for safely traipsing through the neighborhood while masked and gloved. Some simple costume ideas include physician, construction worker, chef (yes, they should be wearing shields these days), and knight.

Keep in mind Halloween that most Halloween masks are not designed to provide protection against germs. Place a cloth or disposable mask underneath the costume's mask for additional protection.

Give your child tongs so they do not have to stick their hands in candy bowls that half the neighbors have touched.

Give your child tongs so they do not have to stick their hands in candy bowls that half the neighbors have touched.

2. Keep a Safe Distance When Approaching a House

Children can trick-or-treat without getting close to the person answering the door. Instruct them to stand back and extend their arms to get candy. If they are the only ones at the door, they can leave their bags by the door and step away. When the person opening the door puts candy in their bag and closes the door, they can retrieve their trick-or-treat bag.

If a group is already waiting for candy at a house where your children want to trick-or-treat, tell your kids to wait until those trick-or-treaters leave before they approach the house for candy.

For additional distance and protection, you can provide your child tongs or a candy grabber. I use the Winco Stainless Steel Utility Tongs, and they are wonderful for turning biscotti and serving pasta. I would recommend them over a candy grabber because you will use them in your kitchen for years. They are also easy for a child to use to grab candy from a bowl. This will put a little extra distance between the child and the person giving out candy.

In addition, your child will not be putting his hands in a candy bowl that has been touched by most of the neighborhood kids. If your child is a chef for Halloween, the tongs can even be a costume accessory. Remind your child to hold the tongs by the handles and avoid putting their hands on the part of the tongs that grips the candy.

3. Accompany Young Children to Each Door

Even if parents are more comfortable accompanying their children around the neighborhood, some children might be old enough to knock on doors themselves. In the past, many parents have chosen to watch their children from the curb. However, if your child is not old enough to fully understand the dangers of COVID, it is best to accompany them to the door, so you can ensure that they are as safe as possible when they trick-or-treat.

4. Limit Your Trick-or-Treating Group and Stay With Them

During past Halloweens, it was not unusual for kids to trick-or-treat with friends and even link up with other groups as the night progressed. Trick-or-treaters should not expand their group while celebrating Halloween this year. Instead, have your children trick-or-treat with one or two friends that they see often or collect candy with family members only.

Bring sanitary wipes to trick-or-treat so your child can wipe their hands periodically.

Bring sanitary wipes to trick-or-treat so your child can wipe their hands periodically.

5. Bring Sanitary Wipes

Use wipes to clean your children's hands periodically while they trick-or-treat. Wipes can also help eliminate germs from candy wrappers. Travel-size packages will fit conveniently in a pocket.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Abby Slutsky

Comments

Abby Slutsky (author) from LAFAYETTE HL on September 22, 2020:

Thank you for reading.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on September 22, 2020:

These are good ideas. It is sad that it has come to this to allow for children to have a semi-normal year, but this hasn't been a normal year. In my neighborhood, the children don't trick-or-treat anymore. Parents mostly go to the "rich" end of town for that with their children. I guess it is just as well.

Blessings,

Denise

Abby Slutsky (author) from LAFAYETTE HL on September 20, 2020:

Thank you so much for reading. I appreciate your time.

JEREMIAH MWANIKI KILUNDA from Nairobi on September 20, 2020:

Crucial tips. Good work!

Abby Slutsky (author) from LAFAYETTE HL on September 20, 2020:

Thanks for reading.

Danny from India on September 20, 2020:

Nice tips

Abby Slutsky (author) from LAFAYETTE HL on September 19, 2020:

Thanks for reading.

Abby Slutsky (author) from LAFAYETTE HL on September 19, 2020:

Thanks for reading.

Sp Greaney from Ireland on September 19, 2020:

It will be an interesting Halloween this year. Last year we had no trick or treaters. So I don't expect any this year.

But I do think mom or dad need to be more cautious if their kids are doing this and your safety suggestions are good.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on September 19, 2020:

We have had less children every year so we are not planning to give candy out this year as we are in the "high risk" catagory. I was curious about your suggestions, and I think they are very good. It certainly needs to be a concern for parents.

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