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What is Groundhog Day? Spiritual Messages From the Day and Movie

Updated on March 17, 2013

Snowdrops - Sign of an Early Spring?

At the end of a long, cold Winter, we all look for signs of Spring. I find a sign in snowdrops, and in Groundhog Day. Where do you see Spring springing up?
At the end of a long, cold Winter, we all look for signs of Spring. I find a sign in snowdrops, and in Groundhog Day. Where do you see Spring springing up? | Source

What Makes Groundhog Day Special?

Groundhog Day seems odd - what is a holiday doing on February second? But, actually, this date is set in the heavens. The day lies halfway between the Winter Solstice on December 21st (the shortest day of the year) and the Spring Equinox on March 21 (when the Earth is straight up in line with the sun, day and night are equal in length, and the sun crosses the equator, bringing the light and warmth of Spring).

In our calendar today, we say that Spring starts on March 21. But that's always seemed kind of odd to me. After all, January is the coldest month. Right around Groundhog Day, as days lengthen and the sun offers more energy to the Earth, things begin to warm up. A few flowers, at least, like snowdrops, are springing up from the Earth. If the weather is warmer and flowers are pushing through, hasn't Spring started?

It turns out that the ancient Celtic people of Europe saw things the same way. For them, spring began on February 2nd, Groundhog Day, which they called Imbolc. The equinox on March 21 was the middle of Spring. Spring ends - and Summer begins - on May 1st, MayDay (also called Beltane).

The Mound of The Hostages

This ancient mound in Ireland has a doorway that opens the tomb to the light only two days a year, and one of them is Groundhog Day.
This ancient mound in Ireland has a doorway that opens the tomb to the light only two days a year, and one of them is Groundhog Day. | Source

How Old is Groundhog Day?

Groundhog day, or Imbolc, is incredibly ancient; over 4,000 years old, in fact!

The Mound of the Hostages, a burial ground built around 2,500 B.C.E., has a doorway that has direct sun falling into it at sunrise only two days a year. Only on these two days does light enter the tomb. One day is Groundhog Day, and the other is Halloween, which marks the end of Fall and the beginning of Winter among Celtic peoples.

In ancient times, Imbolc was associated with Brighid, a Celtic Goddess. When the Celtic peoples became Christian, an adjustment was made and the day was linked to St. Brighid.

Famous Groundhogs?

Groundhog Day has become so popular across North America that there are even statues of famous groundhogs. This isn't Punxsutawney Phil, this is Wiarton Willie, from Wiarton, Ontario, Canada.
Groundhog Day has become so popular across North America that there are even statues of famous groundhogs. This isn't Punxsutawney Phil, this is Wiarton Willie, from Wiarton, Ontario, Canada. | Source

Groundhog Day Comes to America

Imbolc, the Celtic holiday, had a tradition that a badger or a bear might come out of his hole on February 2nd. If he did and it was sunny, he would see his shadow. This would predict 6 more weeks of winter. If the bear or badger did not see his shadow, then spring weather would begin soon, that is, an early Spring.

We don't have many bears or badgers in American farmland. But we do have groundhogs!

So the Pennsylvania Dutch, who are not Dutch at all, but German, changed the tradition. Instead of a bear or badger, the Pennsylvania Dutch would watch for a groundhog to come out of his burrow and see his shadow. If he did, 6 weeks of Winter weather were on the way. If not, Spring had arrived.

Traditional Hex Sign

Source

Pennsylvania Dutch Memories, Food, and Art

If the Pennsylvania Dutch are German, how did they get called Dutch? Simply this, the German word for German is Deutsch. These German-speaking settlers were originally called Pennsylvania Deutsch. This got simplified to Pennsylvania Dutch. Many Pennsylvania Dutch people kept traditional farms and continued to speak German for generations.

They also make great food. I grew up in Philadelphia and learned to enjoy these treats: German chocolate cake; Dutch apple pie; wonderful cheeses; Lebanon Bologna (from Lebanon, PA). If you get to Philadelphia, check them out at the Reading Market in the old train station that brought these goodies in from Reading, PA, the shipping center of the farm country.

The Pennsylvania Dutch are also famous for their blacksmith work and for Hex Signs, colorful geometric and floral designs often symmetrical and painted on a circular board to hang over the doors of barns and houses to bring good luck and ward away evil.

Groundhog Day Traditions

Imbolc, or Groundhog Day, has always been associated with two things: Good or ill fortune, and divination of the future. In ancient times, gifts were offered to the Goddess (later saint) Brighid, asking for her blessings in general, and specifically for the protection of farm animals. Also, various types of divination were tried.

There is one wonderful legend that the Goddess Cailleach, an old woman, would come out on February 2nd to collect firewood for the rest of the winter. Since she was a goddess, if she wanted a long winter, she would make the day sunny so she could collect lots of firewood. If she wasn't worried about gathering much firewood, she would sleep in, and the day would stay cloudy. So a cloudy day meant that Cailleach had decided that Spring was coming soon.

Imbolc has a strong association with candles, fire, and milk. By February 2nd, the sun stays up long enough to milk the sheep and cows by evening light, so candles are spared. Some are lit on the holiday to celebrate the fact that we don't need them any more. Bonfires mark the fact that Winter is passing and we can collect wood again; there is no need to carefully hoard our stores of firewood to survive the Winter. And milk becomes available as the ewes give birth to young lambs and begin to provide sheep's milk.

Imbolc is Still Celebrated Today

Imbolc, which has been celebrated for thousands of years, is still celebrated today. This photo is from Marsden, West Yorkshire, England, in 2005. People dance with torches around the Green Man, who is fighting Jack Frost to bring Spring from Winter.
Imbolc, which has been celebrated for thousands of years, is still celebrated today. This photo is from Marsden, West Yorkshire, England, in 2005. People dance with torches around the Green Man, who is fighting Jack Frost to bring Spring from Winter. | Source

Ancient Spiritual Meanings of Imbolc

I got an email from a friend up north in Wisconsin on January 31st. He said that, right after he went out for a run, it snowed, and he was unpacking skis and skates.

That's what weather means to us now - a simple change of clothing and sporting equipment. Or, if we don't like the weather, we just stay inside.

In ancient times, things were very different. To understand what Imbolc means - why it is a festival or holiday, and why people wanted to know so badly if Spring had come at last, we must imagine life at that time.

Imagine, for a moment, no central heating. Imagine no refrigeration or reliable way to store food. Imagine late frost or snow killing off the Spring crop. Imagine that your grandmother, who lives with you, is sick, and may not live without fresh food. Imagine remembering a friend who's baby died because they planted early last Spring and a late snow wiped out their spring crop, and there wasn't enough food for the family. Imagine another family who starved because their sheep, who gave milk, died.

In a world like that, good fortune, like not getting sick or having healthy animals or meeting a wonderful future husband or wife, can mean the difference between life and death.

In a world like that, six more weeks of winter can be a matter of life and death. Even more so, knowing whether there will be six more weeks of winter, and therefore when to plant, often is a matter of life and death.

And so the ceremony developed as our ancestors sought ways to know the future, and to survive.

This Bear is Seeing Her Shadow

Source

Why the Groundhog (or the Bear, the Badger) and His Shadow?

But there's more going on here. One of the great wisdom lessons of all traditions is that everything changes. And animals do know what is going on with the weather.

A bear semi-hibernates during the winter, and comes out for the Spring. So, when February 2nd comes along, the bear is pretty hungry. She comes out for food:

  • If the weather is so cold that, even in sun, the bear never comes out, that's a sure sign that the ground is still frozen and winter will last a while.
  • If the weather, in general, is still cold, but today, the sun is out, she'll come out to forage even though the season is not changing yet. She'll see her shadow, and the winter is likely to be long.
  • If the weather, in general, is starting to warm up, she'll come out to forage for food even on a cloudy day. It's warm even without the sun; a real sign that Spring is coming. The bear doesn't see her shadow, and Spring has begun.

Is This Even Possible - Scientifically Speaking?

This has not yet been scientifically tested. And we don't know the original location where the bear or badger was thought to have this knowledge. But it is scientifically possible. In scientific terms, in fact, it makes sense in two different ways. First, from recent climate science, we know that local climate is very much changed by the temperature and moisture in the soil. So if the ground is still frozen (the bear stays in, even on a sunny day), then the local climate is likely to stay cold. If the ground is still cold and the bear only comes out on warm sunny days (the bear sees her shadow) then cold is likely to linger. Once spring is coming, the bear comes out, even on cloudy days. If it's time for the bear to find food, it's time to realize Spring is here and start planting.

This also makes sense in terms of evolution. Wild animals have the same problem that farmers do - how to get enough food each Spring and Summer to survive the Winter. So, over millions of years, those bears who were aware of subtle climate signs and behaved accordingly were much more likely to survive. One thing every student of nature has learned is: Don't underestimate the power of natural intelligence.

Perhaps the wisest thing to do is to watch the burrowing and hibernating animals in general, and know that, when they come out on cloudy, cool days, Spring has come. And that wisdom was ritualized into the ceremony of Groundhog Day.

The lesson of wisdom is: Watch what is happening in nature to understand and make a better guess about the future.

Spring is Coming

How do you know when Spring is coming?

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Shadows and Reversals

This photo, with its sand color and cave-painting like quality, evokes the ancient wisdom of shadows and reversals.
This photo, with its sand color and cave-painting like quality, evokes the ancient wisdom of shadows and reversals. | Source

One More Lesson: Unexpected Reversals

There is one more lesson of Groundhog Day. Sun on one day means six more weeks of Winter. Clouds on that day mean Spring is here. There is a sense of unexpected reversal. This is another ancient spiritual lesson. It's a good message for gamblers - every run of good luck is going to end. And it offers hope for those bearing up in times of difficulty - things will turn around. Those who prepare for unexpected reversals do better in good times, as well as in bad ones.

So, the spiritual lessons of the ancient holiday of Imbolc, or Groundhog's Day are:

  • Pay attention to nature, and get a sense of what will happen.
  • Be prepared for unexpected reversals in life, and you will do well.

Now, what does Groundhog Day: The Movie have to teach us?

Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania

A markerPunxsutawney, PA -
Punxsutawney, PA, USA
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Since 1886, Punxsutawney, PA has held an annual Groundhog Day festival on February 2. The movie, Groundhog Day, includes the ceremony.

Punxsutawney, PA: Groundhog Central

Many towns in the US and Canada celebrate Groundhog Day. But Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania (northeast of Pittsburgh, in the center of the state) has the most famous celebration. It's been running every year since 1886, and it comes complete with people in traditional German costume and their own groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil.

A public art project has placed 32 garish fiberglass statues of Phil all around the city.

The ceremony became truly notorious in 1993, when it was the locale of the film, Groundhog Day with BIll Murray. One year, over 40,000 people came to see the event. (Most of the film, though, was actually shot in Woodstock, IL.)

Groundhog Day Ceremony

This photo, 2005, shows the annual ceremony, with men in traditional German formal attire, one of them holding Punxsutawney Phil, the famous groundhog.
This photo, 2005, shows the annual ceremony, with men in traditional German formal attire, one of them holding Punxsutawney Phil, the famous groundhog. | Source

Groundhog Day - The Movie

Groundhog Day, the 1993 movie with Bill Murray, has become an icon in popular culture. In the Movie, Bill Murray plays Phil Connors, an obnoxious, self-centered news weatherman. He comes to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania to cover the annual event in which people dress up in traditional German clothing and watch the world's most famous groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, to see if he sees his shadow.

Now, the ceremony in Punxsutawney is real. It's been happening every year since 1886. And, to be honest, it is kind of silly. But Murray takes it over the top, insulting the day and everything in it, and, above all, offending Rita, played by Andie MacDowell, an eminently desirable young lady on the TV station's weather team.

Source

This set's the stage for the movie's main action, where Phil Connors is trapped in an endless loop of repeating Groundhog Day. Once he realizes he's trapped, he goes through three phases. First, he goes out to enjoy himself. Then he gives up in misery and tries every type of suicide to escape. But no, he wakes up each morning on February second to the alarm clock, trapped on Groundhog's day.

Eventually, he decides to become a better person. That's heading in the right direction. What happens? Well, that would be a spoiler. Let's just say it's a comedy, and comedies have happy endings.

Estimates of how long Connors is trapped vary. The movie leaves it open to interpretation. Some have said 10 years (that's 30,000 days). Others say it would take longer to grow up - perhaps 40 or 50 years. The author of the screenplay was thinking that it would take 10,000 years to learn all the lessons Connors learned.

The Groundhog Day Movie in Popular Culture

US Army Rangers in Somalia and other folks in the military loved the movie when it came out because it reminded them of their own situation - doing the same thing every day while nothing ever changes.

As a result, the phrase "a groundhog day" took on a new meaning. Now, it means a situation that seems stuck and unchanging - a boss who won't listen, a dead-end job, a married couple who repeats the same arguments without listening. All these are groundhog days.

The movie has also inspired many thousands of people to say, "maybe life is about learning to be a good person. Maybe life is about learning to love, not just waiting and hoping for love."

And that is an inspiring message.

See the Movie

Groundhog's Day, the Movie, has been rated one of the greatest spiritual movies of all time. It's also a lot of fun. How many times have you seen it?

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The Spiritual Message of Groundhog Day

Do you feel trapped in your life?

Do situations repeat endlessly, even though you wish they would change? Even though, whatever you do, they don't change?

If so, maybe it's time to consider that waiting for someone else to make a change is not the answer. Maybe even trying to force change is not the answer.

Maybe the answer is to change ourselves. Not to change in a way that is untrue to ourselves, but rather, to release all the blocks and barriers to being who we truly are. Who are we, truly? Personally, I've been asking that for over 30 years. And I've been watching myself and other people as closely as the ancient Celts watched for the bear on Imbolc.

I've come to see that every person, is, in fact, a beautiful, loving human being and a gift to the world.

So, I suggest this: The meaning of Groundhog Day, the movie, is that we are trapped in an endless sequence of days - about 25,000 of them in 70 years - and that the one thing we can do is to release the barriers that keep us from being loving, creative people who serve others and bring joy, health, and peace to this world.

Boy, does the world need people doing that!

Groundhog Day in Life and the Movie - Is There a Connection?

As far as I can tell, the creators of the movie Groundhog day had a comic idea and a spiritual message. And they decided that the holiday was a good thing to poke fun at, and a rural Pennsylvania town was a good setting. So they used Punxsutawney and Groundhog Day as a focal point for their message. But there's no sign that they saw a connection between the movie's message and the holiday.

That doesn't mean that there isn't one. Carl Jung proposed synchronicity - that, because all life is connected, we can find spiritual associations and meanings that connect when things come together. Let's see what happens when the holiday and the movie come together in my meditations.

The lessons from the ancient holiday of Imbolc were:

  • Pay attention to nature, and get a sense of what will happen.
  • Be prepared for unexpected reversals in life, and you will do well.

In the movie, Phil Connors saves a child from injury when he falls from a tree and saves the life of a man who is choking to death. That is, he becomes good fortune, reversing ill fortune. And he goes from thinking he has it all together and is better than etveryone else, that is, thinking that he is the best and wanting only the best (but inside, being miserable) to being truly good and humble. That is, he reverses many things in life. And how does he do this? He pays attention to what is happening, to the life and death all around him. That is, he pays attention to the life and death that comes with the change of seasons.

So, our final message: Do more than survive in the days of your life. Become loving. Become good. How? By flowing with life, by practicing and learning skills, by being humble, by being attentive to others, by reversing ill fortune through wise and generous action, by letting go of arrogance and entitlement and ego.

Wherever that message comes from, it's a good one. Please put it into action - with joy!

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    • promaine profile image

      promaine 4 years ago from New York

      Hi SidKemp, Happy Groundhog say 2013! (It's sunny in NYC, so I guess I should keep the winter clothes!) Voted Up and Awesome. Thanks for this hub, which really goes into deep meanings--both in terms of origins and in terms of the movie! If Groundhog day is a new season in the Celtic calendar, would you say it could also be a time to do a kind of check on ourselves--for example checking our new years' resolutions? Paul

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Hi Paul: Yup! By now, half the people who have made New Years resolutions have already slipped. If you're one of them, check out this hub: http://sidkemp.hubpages.com/hub/Resolution-Slippin...

    • spartucusjones profile image

      CJ Baker 4 years ago from Parts Unknown

      I have seen the movie Groundhog Day a few times and always thought it was good for a few chuckles. Always got a kick out of Bill Murray. That being said I haven't watched it in a while, so I might have to watch it again (maybe today!).

      I also have to admit that I have never made the spiritual connection in the movie. The movie does provide some key inspirational messages. You have definitely provided some good food for thought. This hub was enjoyable and informative!

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Hi Spartacus! Thanks for stopping by, my dearest Luchador. I appreciate your praise,and wish you a great February 3rd. May you get there in one day!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image

      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      You've certainly done some in-depth research on the origin and meaning of Groundhog Day. It's very interesting the way you found a deeper meaning and life lessons in the movie, which I've always thought of as silly fun. Very original and creative!

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Hi Stephanie - The movie is silly fun, and that may be the best part of it. I wouldn't be the first person to accuse myself of being too serious! Thanks!

    • Emanate Presence profile image

      Gary R. Smith 4 years ago from the Head to the Heart

      Sid, your Groundhog hub is fun and informative. It is a pleasant read that blends your personal interest and knowledge with added research and a well-organized presentation. Voted up, useful and interesting.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Hi Emanate - Thanks for your kind thoughts. Maybe we can reclaim Imbolc as a worldwide holiday?!

    • profile image

      Sharon E Welch 4 years ago

      Hi Sid:

      I really enjoyed learning how the old and new connect regarding this special time of year. As always your thoroughness is impressive, intelligent and very informative. Thank you for an enlightening hubpage.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Hi Sharon. Thanks so much. Please spring into action this spring with new-found wisdom!

    • amygillhorton profile image

      Amy Gill-Horton 4 years ago from South-central Alaska

      What a useful article! I am glad to see Groundhog Day so well explained. My husband and I recently discussed how many people we know that don't really get it. For many living in the city or in the Arctic where the ground is frozen for another two months after Groundhog Day, it just doesn't resonate. When he recapped the movie (which I have not seen) it's connection to Imbolc really struck me.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thanks, Amy. The animals and plants in each local climate share their own signs. Thoreau watched the ice breaking up on Walden Pond and understood its rhythms. When we actually connect to the seasons in our own locale, we see true connections. When these are transferred, they become folklore, fun, sometimes wise, and not always factual.

      I hope you'll watch the movie next year! Keep an eye out for more seasonal articles here, too!

    • jbshaban profile image

      jbshaban 4 years ago from California

      All roads lead to Sid! I loved how your article tied in a lot of information on Groundhog Day through the ages, passed through Pennsylvania, my home state (I lived so close to Punxsutawney that I traveled there with the marching band at high school football games), and wrapped it up with a pretty bow by reminding us that bringing joy is what life can be all about.

      It was great to see the Pennsylvania Dutch highlight in your hub. My great grandparents were Germans who settled in Pennsylvania. One note, it is not Lebanese bologna but Lebanon bologna. Being married to a Middle Eastern, I know this well. We eat Lebanon bologna as my sandwich of choice. There is no such lunchmeat in Lebanon the country. They prefer the hot pink, nitrite laden Seniora there.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thanks, Joyce. I've corrected the Lebanese / Lebanon bologna baloney! How do you get your Lebanon Bologna in California? And you've inspired me - it would be fun to write more about the Pennsylvania Dutch, their art, and their culture.

    • jbshaban profile image

      jbshaban 4 years ago from California

      Believe it or not, I've found it at most supermarkets and even the Arabic supermarket! I will work on writing a hub on that theme.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      That's really cool - I'll have to take a closer look for Lebanon Bologna here in Florida.

    • tamarawilhite profile image

      Tamara Wilhite 4 years ago from Fort Worth, Texas

      Fascinating article. The hope for Spring is a chance for new life, especially when food stored over winter is running out.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Yes. And now that we're past the Spring Equinox, I like to say that life - and we, too - are Springing Into Action.

    • Elias Zanetti profile image

      Elias Zanetti 3 years ago from Athens, Greece

      The first time I learned about the Groundhog Day was when I watched the movie. I really enjoyed your hub, the ancient roots of this holiday and the spritual meanings as well.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thank you, Elias. I hope you enjoyed May Day as well, and keep an eye out for Lughnaisaid on August first!

    • gmwilliams profile image

      Grace Marguerite Williams 3 years ago from the Greatest City In The World-New York City, New York

      This is a very interesting and well researched hub. I did not even know about Imbolc Day. Groundhog Day does have spiritual meaning. It signifies the incoming of spring and time to cast aside old methodologies and ways and to embrace new ways of methodologies and growth. In essence, there is always room for ever constant growth and renewal physically, mentally, psychologically, and psychically.

    • Beth Eaglescliffe profile image

      Beth Eaglescliffe 3 years ago from UK

      This is a really interesting article. I had no idea that “Groundhog Day” is genuine day on the calendar. I love the idea that it’s a reminder that luck can change without notice. Voted up!

    • howlermunkey profile image

      Jeff Boettner 3 years ago from Tampa, FL

      Always wondered about the origin of Groundhogs day. 4,000 years old, had no idea. Thanks for sharing (and happy Groundhog day).

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 3 years ago from Germany

      I have not heard of this Groundhog Day. Thanks for the interesting and well researched information. Congrats on the Hub of the Day award! Keep it up.

    • Huntgoddess profile image

      Huntgoddess 3 years ago from Midwest U.S.A.

      This is really great!

      Very informative, beautiful pix, etc. Congratulations on Hub of the Day. I love those snowdrops.

      Up, awesome --- etc. Keep your great Hubs coming.

    • Adityapullagurla profile image

      Aditya Pullagurla 3 years ago from Sydney

      Really good description of the ceremony developed as our ancestors found the ways to know the future, and to survive. Great Hub

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 3 years ago

      I'm not into the giant rat worship but the movie was kinda cute. The timing reminds me of what they do to determine when the Chinese New Year will be.

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      Thanks for shedding so much light on this weird holiday. Happy spring! And congrats on your terrific honor!

    • SidKemp profile image
      Author

      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Hi GM: Thanks for being the first to comment on my hub on Groundhog's Day 2014. I woke up, went outside into the bright Florida sun, saw my shadow, and decided to go back to bed for six week! The signs of the seasons can also guide the pace of our ever-constant growth. Sometimes, it's best to slow down.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thanks Beth - may your luck change for the better.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thanks, Howlermunkey. Happy Groundhog's Day and a Bright Spring!

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thank you, Thelma. If you're in Germany now, you may be able to find out more - it has origins there.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Thanks, HuntGoddess. You're encouraging me to come back to HubPages.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      Nature has so much to teach us - stuff our ancestors knew - thanks, Adityapullagurla.

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      I don't worship giant rats, either, poetryman. There is a temple dedicated to rat worship in Nepal, though. (Nothing to do with us groundhogs - honest!)

    • SidKemp profile image
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      Sid Kemp 3 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

      And may this holiday shed light on you - but not on your local groundhog! Thanks, Rebecca!

    • Huntgoddess profile image

      Huntgoddess 3 years ago from Midwest U.S.A.

      I didn't know you had left Hp? Yes, definitely do come back.

    • profile image

      Denizee 3 years ago

      Truly could appreciate the fantastic Hub about Groundhog Day- I live relatively close to Phila. in NJ and of course it's big news here every year. I've seen the movie as well several times yet what you brought out on the topic were things I had no idea about. I've learned so much in your write - thank you - very enjoyable and voted up.

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